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LOCATING A RESCUE GROUP

LOCATING A RESCUE GROUP

If you are interested in finding a local Rescue Group of a specific dog breed, you may be able to find information on the internet, in a newspaper’s classified ads, through your veterinarian, or through your local shelter. Rescue groups will vary and follow different policies. Many of these organizations can house multiple dogs in a variety of foster homes or kennels. All or nearly all breeds recognized by the American Kennel Club have a national coordinator, regional clubs that provide assistance with rescue efforts, and/or thousands of breeders, exhibitors, and pet owners who contribute to some extend to help purebred dogs. To help jump start your search, you can always contact The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) at 202-452-1100 (ask for the Companion Animals section). The Humane Society will be able to help you locate a breed-specific rescue group near you. When calling them, find out as much information as you can about the group, what steps they take to assure the proper care of the animal, and what other adoption and post-adoption services are available.

ADOPTION

Rescue groups have had great success with placing dogs in new homes. Adopting from them is a wonderful option for people looking for specific breeds. People who work at these organizations are generally very knowledgeable of and have the best interest of the dog in mind. They know and understand fully that t hese animals might have been neglected by their previous owner, may have arrived from boarding kennels and veterinarians where they were dumped, may have been rescued as stray dogs living on the streets, or have been acquired through the coordination with local shelters.

Good rescuers seek to find the perfect family or ‘match’ for the dog. Bear in mind that these workers would not be able to make a perfect match if they fail to ask proper and sufficient questions regarding the environment the dog will live in, the care that will be provided, and so on. Some rescue groups prefer to send out an application beforehand to be returned by the potential adopter. Others will visit the applicants’ houses or check their references before inviting them to see the dogs. Before selecting a purebred dog, potential adopters should always take into consideration the availability of their time, budget, experience with dogs, and house infrastructure. Remember that t he initial adjustment could be a difficult one as the dog learns to trust again or for the first time. Once the new dog feels and absorbs the love of his new home, a long-lasting and wonderful relationship can be established.

SOURCES USED

• CanisMajor.com
• CanisMajor.com